Speaker

KIVANÇ BİRSOY, PhD

Assist. Professor, Rockefeller University

Kıvanç Birsoy received his B.S degree at Bilkent University, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, ranked 1st in the Faculty of Science. He received his Ph.D. in Jeffrey Friedman’s lab at the Rockefeller University (New York), where he studied molecular and cellular basis for obesity. He then studied cancer metabolism at the Whitehead Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge) as a postdoctoral fellow. In 2015, he joined Rockefeller University as assistant professor and serves as the head of Laboratory of Metabolic Regulation and Genetics. His recent studies have begun addressing how cancer cell metabolism can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. He is a recipient of the Jane Coffin Childs Medical Fund Fellow Award, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Special Fellow Award, Sokol Postdoctoral Award and NIH Career Transition Award. He has authored over 25 publications in journals including Nature, Cell, Science and Nature Genetics, and has co-authored several patents.

Abstract



Metabolic plasticity enables organisms to respond and adapt to changes in their environment. While the core components of most pathways of intermediary metabolism have long been described – consisting of ~3000 metabolic genes organized in pathways interconnected by 1000s of shared metabolites –, it remains poorly understood how the flow of these metabolites is rewired in different metabolic states. This question is particularly relevant in the context of tumors, as cancer cells are frequently starved for nutrients and exposed to toxic waste products due to a combination of increased nutrient consumption and dysfunctional vasculature. Exploring cancer metabolism also provides a tractable system to address a more fundamental question of how metabolic pathways and extracellular cues cooperate to meet the energetic and biosynthetic needs of cells at different metabolic states of metabolic diseases. In the Birsoy lab, we combine a number of cutting-edge techniques – from the development of forward genetics tools (i.e. CRISPR-Cas9 technology) to metabolomics – to elucidate how cellular metabolism contributes to human disorders such as cancer and inborn errors of metabolism.

Symposium Faculty

ALAN D. ATTIE

Professor, Biochemistry
University of Wisconsin

LAURIE H. GLIMCHER

Professor, Dean of Cornell Medical School

ROBERT FARESE

Professor, Genetics and Complex Diseases
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

GÖKHAN HOTAMIŞLIGİL

Professor, Genetics and Metabolism and Nutrition
Harvard University

BRIAN KOBILKA

Professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology
Stanford University

SUSANNE MANDRUP

Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Southern Denmark

EMILIE MARCUS

CEO of Cell Press and Editor of Cell

RUSLAN MEDZHITOV

David W. Wallace Professor of Immunobiology; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University, HHMI

IRA TABAS

Professor, Anatomy Cell Biology
Columbia University

PETER TONTONOZ

Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of California Los Angeles

DENİZ ATASOY

Assistant Professor, Physiology, School of Medicine
İstanbul Medipol University

EBRU ERBAY

Assistant Professor, Molecular Biology and Genetics
Bilkent University

KIVANÇ BİRSOY

Assistant Professor, Molecular Biology and Genetics
Rockefeller University

LALE OZCAN

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
Columbia University Medical Center